Eric Lefkofsky Creates the Technology for Cancer Treatment.

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Currently cancer is second place on the list of causes of death in the US and despite the years of study and treatment, curing cancer is still elusive and it is still a killer. Each type of cancer is specific to the organ(s) affected and to the individual’s genetic sequences, meaning that effective cancer treatments require some customization to be useful to a patient.

Learning about these challenges during his wife’s cancer treatment Eric Lefkofsky, a technological entrepreneur in the chicago area, also learned that despite the commonality of electronic health records, there wasn’t a complete system that streamlines the data and makes it useful to physicians. In response to this problem, Erock Lefkofsky co-founded Tempus, a software system that accumulates cancer patient data, including physician notes, as well as amassing information through human genome sequencing to provide a complete picture of the patient and allows for structured therapies and treatments designed for the patient’s needs.

No stranger to technology entrepreneurship, Eric Lefkofsky has been involved in several platforms and systems throughout his career, the co-founder of Groupon, Lightbank, Uptake Technologies, Media Ocean, Echo, Global Logistics and Innerworkings, Eric Lefkofsky is familiar with challenges in developing platforms that provide solid data analysis and is equipped to overcome those challenges.

An alumni from the University of Michigan, Eric Lefkofsky also focuses on helping his Chicago community by establishing the Lefkofsky Family Foundation and serves upon the boards of Lurie’s Children Memorial Hospital, The Art Institute of Chicago and is the current chairman of the board of trustees for Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre. He also teaches at the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business. Eric Lefkofsky’s community involvement is extensive.

As Tempus begins to provide the analytics required by today’s physicians to combat cancer and geneticists continue to study and design genome specific therapies, perhaps soon cancer will no longer be the killer it is considered.